An open source port scanner that is helping some bad guys

An open source port scanning tool, masscan, is being used to repeatedly attack my web sites. There are certainly lots of such tools widely available that even criminals with no skills can get their hands on and randomly try to break sites. IT security is a never ending quest that is best left to dedicated professionals.

Port scanning is one of those annoying activities that the bad guys may use while attempting to try and find back doors on systems. The principle is simple, find out what ports a system has left open, if you recognise any, try a dictionary like attack on these ports. All it takes is a simple bot.

Last few months, I have noticed multiple port scan attacks at my web sites from a user agent “masscan/1.0”. I dug a little and found this to be coming from an open source tool, the project on Github:

robertdavidgraham/masscan

So, it seems that some people have found this tool, and are now randomly targeting web sites with it. To what aim, I can’t tell for sure. It is certainly reprehensible to be poking at someone’s doors without their consent, everybody knows this.

I’ve also noticed lots of attempts to run PHP scripts, they seem to be looking for PhpMyAdmin. Fortunately I don’t run anything with PHP. If I did, I would harden it significantly and have it permanently monitored for possible attacks.

Most of the attacks on my web sites originate from, in this order: China, Ukraine, Russia, Poland, Romania, and occasionally, the US.

You don’t need anything sophisticated to detect these kind of attacks, your web server log is an obvious place. Putting a firewall in place is a no-brainer, just block everything except normal web site http and https traffics. You can invest also more in tools, then the question is if you’re not better off just hosting at a well known provider.

This is just one instance, and there are infinitely many, where even the dumbest criminals are getting their hands on tools to try and break into systems. Cloud hosting are getting cheaper all the time, soon it will cost nothing to host some program that can wander about the Internet unfettered. Proportionally, it is getting exponentially easier to attack web sites, while at the same time, it is getting an order of magnitude higher to keep sites secure.

I do see a shimmering light, container technologies provide for a perfect throwable computing experience. Just start a container, keep it stateless, carry out some tasks, when done, throw it away. Just like that. This may reduce the exposure in some cases, it won’t be sustainable for providing an on-going long-running service.

IT security is a never ending quest that is best left to dedicated professionals. I am just casually checking these web sites that I run. At the moment, I haven’t deployed any sensitive data on these sites yet. When I do, I will make sure they are super hardened and manned properly, likely a SaaS provider rather than spending my time dealing with this.