Adobe Slate, an attractive tool for publishing nicely laid out content

It should have been possible to easily author and publish polished web content with word processors. It wasn’t, and still largely isn’t. A recently introduced product, Adobe Slate, seem to have solved this for iPad users.

It is time to revise a past blog post where I talked about missed opportunity for word processors. With Adobe Slate, it is fair to say that iPad users can now easily publish nicely laid out content.  I tried it briefly, it’s effortless to start with, all you need is some content. Well, I think this should have always been possible with the word processors that have been on the market all this time.

There is one drawback to Adobe Slate though, it requires an account with Adobe Cloud. I understand the rationale, but this, to me, is an unnecessary barrier to adoption.

Adobe Slate web site.

 

Make a business app without writing a single line of code

Writing a business app for iOS, Android and Windows Phone without writing a line of code. This is the challenge that a company seems to have set out to address. I took it for a quick spin, it looks impressive for a first start.

If you’ve been here before, you know that I always express skepticism when I encounter this kind of claim. But when someone like Scott Hanselman tweets it, then I pay attention and will give it a shot. That’s what I did and here is how it went.

I visited the site, followed the link to create an app, picked a template/example and simply accepted all defaults. I chose to download the source codes. Within about 3 minutes I had three apps downloaded to my mac. The web site looks clean, it’s easy to follow.

App Control panel
App Control panel

There’s an option to download the fully built and ready-to-go app.

Trigger app build process App's being prepared for download Download your app

When you install the app, you get something that is really basic but functioning.

login view

main view

I then loaded the iOS version on Xcode to take a look at the source code. Browsing around I saw a source tree that is reasonably well organised, clean, simple and straightforward. You see that it doesn’t have much feature. I wouldn’t call this a foundation to base anything evolved on, but the basic hierarchical navigation views are in place.

Sample app in Xcode

I tried to build from Xcode and straight away the code wouldn’t compile. I saw there were missing dependencies, could try to solve that manually but decided to use cocoapod for that (everybody does these days). Indeed the presence of podspec file was another give away. After refreshing the dependencies, the code still wouldn’t compile, the Test target failed. So I deleted the Test target, then the code runs. I couldn’t be bothered to spend much time on this.

There’s also Android and Windows app source codes available. I didn’t take time to go through those, but I expect they would be similar: basic structure, quick and easy, but not much feature to see. To be honest, the basic app structure created by Xcode would be much like what you get here, one benefit is that through the theme feature of the web site, it’s possible to make it a bit more proprietary and get going.

Brief summary

For a beta service, this looks like a good start. It certainly will help people who just need a decent looking prototype to get started. The concept of App Builder, aiming at people who don’t want to write code, seems to be in motion. I’m not sure how much success they’re getting, but it is worth checking them out regularly. There might be situations where even a professional developer would want to get something simple out quickly, particularly throwaway ephemeral apps that are not worth over-engineering. This one looks good for that kind of purpose. For more elaborate needs however, writing code is still going to win the day.

To write good code, you need to think carefully about what you’re trying to do, what the context is and what the constraints are, then design a solution that cater for those things.

Who is set to benefit from the introduction of Swift programming language

Swift could open up a great opportunity for Apple, getting large number of developers to write programs for OSX and iOS. Conversely, Swift could be the opportunity that some would be waiting for to start leveraging their skills on Apple ecosystem. Swift could be a blow to those ecosystems as Apple is suddenly more attractive to a rising generation of developers enamoured with functional programming.

One of my first reactions to Swift was the following:

In this post I elaborate a little more on the reasons that I held this belief, that everybody wins.

  • Apple, obviously: legions of developers who might have been put off by Objective-C will now give a second look and many are likely to write code for Apple platforms.
  • Groovy, Scala, Objective Caml programmer: programmers experienced with these languages can now leverage their skills to build solutions for the Apple platform without having to learn another language. Their main hurdle would be  to get acquainted with iOS and OSX platform concepts and building blocks.
  • Scala ecosystem: the introduction of Swift might have the side effect of actually making some people understand Scala better and quicker, this because  it shares many concepts with Scala but has a more readable syntax
  • A converse effect of the above bullet point: Apple developers who make the jump to Swift, would also realise the many benefits of functional programming and adopt languages like Groovy, Scala or Erlang.

Folks looking for new opportunities should find plenty. From a business opportunity perspective, here are some potentially profitable developments:

  • Groovy backend for Clang and LLVM: this could make it possible to write native iOS and OSX code in Groovy. People used to writing web only code would suddenly be able to port their solutions to the Apple platform.
  • Cross Training Developers: this could be the best time for Groovy or Scala training organisations to tap into the masses of iOS and OSX developers scrambling to learn functional programming. Why leave that money on the table?
  • Apple and Pivotal work together: this is a bit tangential, but if Apple were interested in expanding their Cloud clout, this is a good way to do that because they suddenly would be able to target the data centre too! Just buy Pivotal and leapfrog both Microsoft and Google in one fell swoop!

I don’t see yet how Swift could benefit either Microsoft or Google ecosystems. If anything, this could be a blow to those ecosystems as Apple is suddenly more attractive to a rising generation of developers converting to functional programming.